Steroid use in high school sports

The number of players who have admitted using steroids in a confidential survey conducted by the NCAA since the 1980s has dropped from percent in 1989 to percent in 2003. [5] During the 2003 season, there were over 7,000 drug tests, with just 77 turning up as positive test results. [5] Scukanec claims that methods were used to get around the drug testing, whether it be avoiding the tests by using the drugs during the off-season, or flushing the drugs out of your system. This was used with a liquid he referred to as the "pink." [5] He stated:

A majority of the states have testing programs or policies either at the state level or at the district level. The district of Alaska which is the biggest school district in the state of Anchorage has a ban on the use of steroids. In Colorado and Wisconsin, it is the Athletics association that mentions the use of steroids in the bulletins and literature that it sends out to schools that are members. Georgia and Rhode Island have policies that denounce using steroids while Illinois is in the process of forming a plan for steroid testing. Massachusetts promotes a wellness program and regulations against the use of steroids. Mississippi and Missouri have testing programs that are mandatory. Nevada requires its athletes to sign contracts that say that they won’t use steroids. New Mexico has a steroid task force as testing would be an expensive proposition. Oregon, Ohio and Nebraska find that education programs are more effective than testing programs. North Dakota has penalties for the use of steroids. Oklahoma, Wyoming and West Virginia have testing as part of their policies.

In addition to the mentioned side effects several others have been reported. In both males and females acne are frequently reported, as well as hypertrophy of sebaceous glands, increased tallow excretion, hair loss, and alopecia. There is some evidence that anabolic steroid abuse may affect the immune system, leading to a decreased effectiveness of the defense system. Steroid use decreases the glucose tolerance, while there is an increase in insulin resistance. These changes mimic Type II diabetes. These changes seem to be reversible after abstention from the drugs.

This obsession has become so common that Dr. Pope has come up with a term for it: Adonis Complex. What fuels it, he says, are the ridiculously outsized bodies purveyed by Hollywood, magazine covers, and even action-toy manufacturers (just check out the size of . Joe these days). "One of the biggest lies being handed to American men today is that you can somehow attain by natural means the huge shoulders and pectorals of the biggest men in the magazines," says Dr. Pope. "Generations of young men are working hard in the gym and wondering what on earth they're doing wrong. They don't realize that the 'hypermale' look that's so prevalent these days is essentially unattainable without steroids."

Steroid use in high school sports

steroid use in high school sports

This obsession has become so common that Dr. Pope has come up with a term for it: Adonis Complex. What fuels it, he says, are the ridiculously outsized bodies purveyed by Hollywood, magazine covers, and even action-toy manufacturers (just check out the size of . Joe these days). "One of the biggest lies being handed to American men today is that you can somehow attain by natural means the huge shoulders and pectorals of the biggest men in the magazines," says Dr. Pope. "Generations of young men are working hard in the gym and wondering what on earth they're doing wrong. They don't realize that the 'hypermale' look that's so prevalent these days is essentially unattainable without steroids."

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